ICOM 9 – 9th International Conference on Mycorrhiza


ICOM 9

My team will be attending the next International Workshop on Edible Mycorrhizal Mushrooms in Cahors (France) next october 2016. This workshop was created as a small group from the large International Conference on Mycorrhiza to be able to discuss just topics about edible mycorrhizal mushrooms, as most topics on ICOM are related to endomycorrhizas, the ones mostly used for agriculture.

The next ICOM 9 – 9th International Conference on Mycorrhiza will be in Prague, Czech Republic   July 30 to August 4,2017

And after the french coming, the next IWEMM-9 will be in México in July 2017!

Just received information about this new conference, just in case anyone is interested to attend:
http://www.fungiofegypt.com/Conference/

Cheers

Marcos S. Morcillo

About trufflefarming

CEO of Micofora. Truffles and edible wild mushroom science and farming. Researcher, truffle farmer & mycologist
This entry was posted in truffle conferences congress workshops, Uncategorized and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to ICOM 9 – 9th International Conference on Mycorrhiza

  1. andresh3 says:

    Hi Marcos,

    When we host truffle hunts, people often ask about the requirement for frosts for truffles. My usual response is that this is an urban myth and that the very large production in Western Australia clearly indicates that it is not a requirement as they do not have frosts in general. Others have commented that the lack of frosts may contribute to a reduction in aroma from WA truffles. I think it is more likely that the sheer quantity of truffle being harvested means that there is more chance that truffles will not be harvested at their peak. Boutique growers typically harvest individual truffles at their absolute peak, which cannot be done on a commercial scale – I can hear the cries of the WA growers baying for my blood already… lucky I have a thick peridium.

    Appreciate your thoughts on the cause and effect of frosts on truffle quality.

    Andres

    ________________________________

    trufflefarming posted: ” My team will be attending the next International Workshop on Edible Mycorrhizal Mushrooms in Cahors (France) next october 2016. This workshop was created as a small group from the large International Conference on Mycorrhiza to be able to discuss just t”

    • Hi Andres,
      great question but no answer for it!
      There is no really scientific data about how many cold hours or frost days are needed for truffles to get ripe or if this may affect their aroma.
      On the other hand we know frost may damage shallow truffles. Heavy frosts damage fruit bodies completely and sometimes fruit bodies may recover from light frosts and then (specially the upper part) becomes like “cork”…
      Popular culture in Spain says we need cold for the black truffle to get the aroma, so something should be behind that, we don´t know for sure.
      We know bacteria play a major role in aromas, and Pseudomonas enjoy medium temperatures but not cold, maybe there are some bacteria that enjoy cold that produce some VOCs we are not detecting in normal studies. Note in most studies the VOCs analyzed are just the main 16 ones, so we don´t detect slight modifications in aroma complexity.

      The other day I was talking about that with Dr. Pedro Marco, who will give a workshop on truffle aromas in our barcelonatruffletour.com. he suggested that we can maybe see the picture from the other side:
      Maybe T. melanosporum makes a more complex aroma profile because normally it fruits in colder areas, and to avoid frost damage, fruit more deep in the ground and so need to make heavier aromas to be found by wild animals…
      The summer truffle, that is getting ripe in warmer conditions (during the summer) produces a less pungent aroma. Could it be because it normally fruits more shallow, close to the surface and then need less pungent and complex aroma to be found by the wild boar?

      As you can see Andres, just ideas to think about, but not really answers 😉

      Hugs,
      Marcos

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